AMT - 001 ( Bagan Fully Day Tour )

10 hr

E-Ticket

Instant Confirmation

Day Trip

Group Tour

Itinerary
This is a typical itinerary for this product

Stop At: Shwezigon Paya, Bagan Myanmar

A prototype of Burmese stupas, it consists of a circular gold leaf-gilded stupa surrounded by smaller temples and shrines. Construction of the Shwezigon Pagoda began during the reign of King Anawrahtar ( 1044–77), who was the founder of the Pagan Dynasty, in 1059–1060 and was completed in 1102 AD, during the reign of his son King Kyansittha. Over the centuries...
Itinerary
This is a typical itinerary for this product

Stop At: Shwezigon Paya, Bagan Myanmar

A prototype of Burmese stupas, it consists of a circular gold leaf-gilded stupa surrounded by smaller temples and shrines. Construction of the Shwezigon Pagoda began during the reign of King Anawrahtar ( 1044–77), who was the founder of the Pagan Dynasty, in 1059–1060 and was completed in 1102 AD, during the reign of his son King Kyansittha. Over the centuries the pagoda had been damaged by many earthquakes and other natural calamities, and has been refurbished several times. In recent renovations it has been covered by more than 30,000 copper plates. However, the lowest level terraces have remained as they were.

Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Htilominlo Pahto, Bagan Myanmar

Htilominlo called Nadaungmya or Zeya Theinkha Uzana; 1175 – 1235) was king of Pagan dynasty of Burma (Myanmar) from 1211 to 1235. His 24-year reign marked the beginning of the gradual decline of Pagan dynasty. It was the first to see the impact of over a century of continuous growth of tax-free religious wealth, which had greatly reduced the potential tax base. Htilominlo was the last of the temple builders although most of his temples were in remote lands not in the Pagan region, reflecting the deteriorating state of royal treasury.

Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Ananda Temple, Beside Anawrahta Road, Bagan 05232 Myanmar

Ananda Temple is a Buddhist temple built in 1105 AD during the reign (1084–1113) of King Kyanzittha of the Pagan Dynasty. The temple layout is in a cruciform with several terraces leading to a small pagoda at the top covered by an umbrella known as hti, which is the name of the umbrella or top ornament found in almost all pagodas in Myanmar. The Buddhist temple houses four standing Buddhas, each one facing the cardinal direction of East, North, West and South. The temple is said to be an architectural wonder in a fusion of Mon and adopted Indian style of architecture. The impressive temple has also been titled the "Westminster Abbey of Burma". The temple has close similarity to the Pathothamya temple of the 10th–11th century, and is also known as “veritable museum of stones”.

Duration: 1 hour

Stop At: Myazedi Pagoda, Near Gubyaukgyi Myinkaba Temple, Bagan Myanmar

Myazedi inscription also Yazakumar Inscription or the Gubyaukgyi Inscription), inscribed in 1113, is the oldest surviving stone inscription of the Burmese. "Myazedi" means "emerald stupa" ("zedi" being akin to the Pali "cetiya" and Thai "chedi"), and the name of the inscription comes from a pagoda located nearby. The inscriptions were made in four languages: Burmese, Pyu, Mon, and Pali,158 which all tell the story of Prince Yazakumar and King Kyansittha. The primary importance of the Myazedi inscription is that the inscriptions allowed for the deciphering of the written Pyu language.

There are two main inscriptions in Burma today. One exists on the platform of the Myazedi Pagoda, in the village of Myinkaba (south of Bagan), in Mandalay Division. The other was discovered by German Pali scholar Dr. Emil Forchammar in 1886-1887, and is currently in display at the Bagan Archaeological Museum. The Myazedi inscription is recognised as Memory of the World Register by UNESCO.

Duration: 45 minutes

Stop At: Manuha Temple, Bagan Myanmar

Manuha Temple is a Buddhist temple built in Myinkaba (located near Bagan), by captive Mon King Manuha in 1067, according to King Manuha's inscriptions. It is a rectangular building of two storeys. The building contains three images of seated Buddhas and an image of Buddha entering Nirvana. Manuha Temple is one of the oldest temples in Bagan.

About the same time Makuta, captive king of the Thaton Kingdom:150 (his name is now corrupted into 'Manuha'), must have built his colossal images at Myinpagan, where he was living in captivity, a mile S. of Pagan. "Stricken with remorse", says the Glass Palace Chronicle, "he built a colossal Buddha with legs crossed, and a dying Buddha as it were making pariniruâna; and he prayed saying 'Whithersoever I migrate in samsâra, may I never be conquered by another!' The temple is called Manuha to this day.


Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Dhammayangyi Temple, Bagan Myanmar

Largest of all the temples in Bagan, the Dhammayan as it is popularly known was built during the reign of King Narathu :167 (1167-1170). Narathu, who came to the throne by assassinating his father Alaungsithu and his elder brother, presumably built this largest temple to atone for his sins.

Duration: 40 minutes

Stop At: Sulamani Guphaya Temple, Minnanthu, Bagan Myanmar

The Sulamani Temple is a Buddhist temple located in the village of Minnanthu (southwest of Bagan) in Burma. The temple is one of the most-frequently visited in Bagan.

It was built in 1183 by King Narapatisithu,178 and is similar to the Thatbyinnyu Temple in design. The Sulamani Temple also shows influence from the Dhammayangyi Temple, and was the model for the Htilominlo Temple. Sulamani Temple was restored after the 1975 earthquake, and utilises brick and stone, with frescoes in the interior of the temple. It was rebuilt in 1994.

Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Dhammayazika Pagoda, Bagan Myanmar

The Dhammayazika Pagoda is a Buddhist temple located in the village of Pwasaw (located east of Bagan) in Burma. It was built in 1196 during the reign of King Narapatisithu. The pagoda is circular in design, and is made of brick. Its three terraces contain terra cotta tiles illustrating scenes from the Jataka.

Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Shwegu Gyi Phaya, Old Bagan, Myanmar (Burma)

Shwegugyi Temple is a Buddhist temple in Bagan, an ancient city located in the Mandalay Region of Myanmar. From the 9th to 13th centuries, the city was the capital of the Pagan Kingdom, the first kingdom that unified the regions that would later constitute modern Myanmar.

The temple was built during the reign of King Alaungsithu in 1131.166 The temple itself is built on an expansive brick foundation 3 metres (13 ft) tall. The temple is known for its arched windows, and its history, which is inscribed in two stone slabs in Pali. According to its inscription, the temple was completed in seven months.

Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Bu Phaya, ပုဂံမြို့ဟောင်း, Myanmar (Burma)

Bupaya Pagoda is a notable pagoda located in Bagan (formerly Pagan), in Myanmar, at a bend on the right bank of the Ayeyarwady River. The small pagoda, which has a bulbous shaped dome, is widely believed to have been built by the third King of Pagan, Pyusawhti who ruled from 168 to 243 AD. It is one of the most notable shrines among the thousands of new or ruined Pagodas in Pagan, which is located about 90 miles (140 km) south of Mandalay.

The original pagoda was completely destroyed in the 1975 earthquake. As result of this earthquake, the bulbous pagoda broke into pieces and fell into the river. It was, however, fully reconstructed using modern materials, with lesser adherence to the original design. Subsequently, it was built as a gilded superstructure.

Duration: 30 minutes

AMT - 001 ( Bagan Fully Day Tour ) photo 1 AMT - 001 ( Bagan Fully Day Tour ) photo 2 AMT - 001 ( Bagan Fully Day Tour ) photo 3 AMT - 001 ( Bagan Fully Day Tour ) photo 4
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Important Details

Included
  • Air-conditioned vehicle
  • Entry/Admission - Dhammayazika Pagoda
  • Bottled water
  • Entry/Admission - Shwezigon Paya
  • Private transportation
  • Entry/Admission - Htilominlo Pahto
  • Entry/Admission - Shwegu Gyi Phaya
  • Entry/Admission - Myazedi Pagoda
  • Entry/Admission - Manuha Temple
  • Entry/Admission - Bu Phaya
  • Entry/Admission - Ananda Temple
  • Entry/Admission - Dhammayangyi Temple
  • Entry/Admission - Sulamani Guphaya Temple
Not Included
  • Lunch
  • All Fees and Taxes
  • Dinner
Departure Point
Bagan Nyaung-U Airport, Nyaung-U, Myanmar (Burma)
12:00 AM
Return Details
Returns to original departure point
Additional Info
  • Confirmation will be received at time of booking
  • Not wheelchair accessible
  • Near public transportation
  • Infants must sit on laps
  • Most travelers can participate
  • This experience requires good weather. If it’s canceled due to poor weather, you’ll be offered a different date or a full refund
  • This is a private tour/activity. Only your group will participate
Voucher Requirements

You can present either a paper or an electronic voucher for this activity.

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Cancellation Policy

For a full refund, cancel at least 48 hours in advance of the start date of the experience.